Even worse, many of these pills contain undeclared substances to make buyer believe the product works. There are hundreds of different so called penis enalrgement pills on the FDAs official “Tainted Sexual Health Products” warning list, including some very well known and popular pill brands. The hidden drug ingredients are often Sildenafil (Viagra), Tadalafil (Cialis) or Vardenafil, subtances used to treat erection problems, short ED (erectile dysfunction). While these prescription only drugs can help patients suffering from ED, they can also have dangerous side effects and interactions, especially for people taking certain cardiac drugs. In the worst case, they can cause heart attacks, there are several verified actual deaths related to dubious penis pills. Don’t risk your life and stay away from enhancement pills, no matter how tempting the advertsing or fake reviews sound. Go for effective natural training instead.

Even those penile extenders and stretchers that claim to work over time would actually just be stretching your flaccid length, and that has absolutely no correlation to how big you get when hard, says Fisch. So don’t waste your money on a product or service that swears it can give you five more inches. “There’s no actual scientific study that they rely on."
Penis pumps. These plastic tubes create a partial vacuum around the penis. The vacuum draws blood into the organ, resulting in temporary size enhancement. Models differ, but all include a plastic tube and a pump operated by a hand bulb. You squeeze the bulb, which evacuates air from the tube, drawing a little extra blood into the penis. Just remember, the effect is modest and temporary.
“This notification is to inform the public of a growing trend of dietary supplements or conventional foods with hidden drugs and chemicals. These products are typically promoted for sexual enhancement, weight loss, and body building, and are often represented as being ‘all natural.’ FDA is unable to test and identify all products marketed as dietary supplements on the market that have potentially harmful hidden ingredients.”
Two urological researchers, Marco Ordera and Paolo Gontero of the University of Turin in Italy, examined outcomes from both surgical and nonsurgical procedures for “male enhancement” in previous studies. Half of the studies involved surgical procedures performed on 121 men; the other half involved nonsurgical enhancement techniques used by 109 men.
Lawyers at the Electronic Frontier Foundation were jubilant. "Today's decision is the only federal appellate decision currently on the books that squarely rules on this critically important privacy issue," wrote EFF lawyer Kevin Bankston. "When the government secretly demands someone's e-mail without probable cause, the e-mail provider can confidently say: 'Come back with a warrant.'"

There are several surgical treatments, most of which carry a risk of significant complications.[6] Procedures by unlicensed surgeons can lead to serious complications.[7] Risky surgical treatments include subcutaneous fat injection, division of the suspensory ligament, and the injection of dermal fillers, silicone gel, or PMMA.[8][9] The American Urological Association (AUA) and the Urology Care Foundation "consider subcutaneous fat injection for increasing penile girth to be a procedure which has not been shown to be safe or efficacious. The AUA also considers the division of the suspensory ligament of the penis for increasing penile length in adults to be a procedure which has not been shown to be safe or efficacious."[10] Dermal fillers are also not approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in the penis.[11]
“Male anxiety about penis size may not reflect internalized, culturally arbitrary masculine stereotypes, but an accurate appreciation that size matters to many women — just as men feel legitimate anxiety when they enter the mating market about their intelligence, personality traits, sense of humor, social status, height, wealth, and other traits known to be favored by women across cultures,” study researcher Stuart Brody, a psychologist at the University of the West of Scotland, told LiveScience.”
In July 2017, the 55-year-old decorator, from London, became one of a growing number of British men to have a surgical penis enlargement. Talk of enhancement was once the preserve of promotional spam mail for bizarre-looking pills and pumps; now, it is serious clinical business. British clinics, which have taken consultancy rooms in Harley Street and in UK cities including Manchester, Sheffield, Birmingham and Leeds, report record numbers of patients calling on their services. One practice, the London Centre for Aesthetic Surgery, has gone from performing a handful of penis procedures annually when it opened in 1990 to more than 250 in 2017. Between 2013 and 2017, members of the International Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgery carried out 45,604 penis enhancements worldwide. Previous numbers are unknown; the procedure was considered such a minority concern that it wasn’t included in surveys. This increase in demand seemingly caters to a growing anxiety about penis size, but it is by no means a risk-free procedure. For Alistair, dreams of a larger penis were overtaken by infections, lumps and an erection that no longer rises above a 45-degree angle. And he is not alone. In recent years, the General Medical Council has recorded stories of “wonky penises” and erectile dysfunction following surgery. In Stockholm, last summer, a 30-year-old man died after suffering a cardiac arrest following an operation to enlarge his penis.

Atherosclerosis, a condition in which fatty deposits build up inside arteries, may restrict blood flow to the penis and cause erection difficulties. "The small blood vessels that go to the penis can become diseased much earlier than the [larger] vessels that go to the heart," Karen Boyle, MD, a urologist at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, tells WebMD. "In younger or younger middle-aged men, ED is often the first sign of atherosclerosis."
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