“There’s no legitimate way to do it,” Danoff said, explaining that, unlike the breasts or the nose, the penis is not a static organ, it needs to move, and “there’s not a grafting material that’s suitable for that.” While there is one procedure that involves cutting the suspensory ligament, this only gives “an illusion of length,” he said. It doesn't actually extend it.
One Stockport-based surgeon, Ravi Kant Agarwal, was struck off (though later allowed to practise again) after botching two procedures. One of his patients, the General Medical Council heard, was left with a penis “bent like a boomerang”. Agarwal was criticised for failing to explain potential complications and misleading patients about the possible outcome, as well as for not having anaesthetic backup during the operations.
And speaking of reconstructive surgery, this is a huge risk as well.  I'm not qualified to speak knowledgeably about this topic.  But my understanding is this kind of surgery is usually only an option for medical need.  Completely non-functioning penis, reconstruction after serious injury, sex changes, that kind of thing.  If you were to do this for purely cosmetic reasons, for example because you want a bigger member, if you found a doctor who was willing to do this for you my understanding is that you'll trade this off with a loss of sensitivity.  Depending on the methods used, you could wind up with nerve damage, or even areas of no sensitivity.  And sensation is one of the major mechanisms for many men to achieve an erection.  I have heard tell of men who got such surgeries only to wind up with a larger penis that didn't perform.

The resistance to refunds reached comic extremes. The dry description of Sixth Circuit Appeals Court Judge Danny Boggs illustrated the lengths to which Berkeley would go to avoid returning cash: "At one point, Enzyte customers seeking a refund were told they needed to obtain a notarized document indicating that they had experienced 'no size increase.' The admittedly ingenious idea behind the policy was that nobody 'would actually go and have anything notarized that said that they had a small penis.'

It's not clear if "Stiff Nights" is a "dietary supplement" as its maker claims, or a bad b-movie title, but in either case the FDA says men looking to "regain the thunder" should stay clear because the pill really contains sulfoaildenafil, an untested chemical similar to the active ingredient in Viagra, which can interact badly with nitrates and cause low blood pressure.


There are literally hundreds of advertisements and articles on penis enlargement, and your email inbox probably suffers as a result. They talk about the amazing, "unbelievable" results that can be achieved, but the only honest word here is "unbelievable." Save your money. Nothing currently on the market has been shown to permanently increase penis size.
Instead of furtively turning to untested methods, men with persistent concerns should consider opening up about them with their doctors. That's because performance problems sometimes act as an early warning signal for serious health problems. Your doctor might be able to prescribe something that can really help, or least provide a valuable dose of perspective about what constitutes "normal" sexual performance.
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