Many doctors question whether the benefits of lengthening surgery outweigh the risks. A 2006 study found that only 35% of men were satisfied with the outcome of surgery, which added only half an inch, on average, to length. Men who are overly preoccupied with penis length tend to have unrealistic expectations of surgery and should seek counseling instead, the authors wrote.
Yes, it can, but surgery is always associated with risks, including anesthesia, wound healing deficits, pain from scars, worst case even a deformed penis or permanent erectile problems. It’s effective without a doubt, but the last resort in our opinion. For men with a real micropenis (smaller than 2.75 inch) it’s often the only solution and covered by health insurance, but only about 0.5% of all men worldwide suffer from this condition. If you are just a bit below average, the risk versus reward calculation is negative for surgical penis enlargement. Especially one problem that arises from cutting the ligaments, the erection pointing slightly downwards instead of straight forward, can become a real problem according to professor Kevan Wylie from the NHS, he said “It can make sex quite uncomfortable. You’ve got to do a lot more manoeuvring with your partner. The advantage of a 2cm (0,8 inch) gain in flaccid length is far outweighed by the loss of angle of erection.”

"They're a complete waste of time," says Professor Wylie. "Pills and lotions have no proven benefit. If they were effective, they would be on sale at chemists. Using a lotion may help a man become more familiar with his penis, which some men shy away from. So lotions can help a man become more comfortable with his penis but they certainly won't make it any bigger."


Performed on the halfway tumescent penis, jelqing is a manual manipulation of simultaneous squeezing and stroking the shaft from base to corona. Also called "milking",[19] the technique has ancient Arab origins.[20] Despite many anecdotal reports of success, medical evidence is absent.[21] Journalists have dismissed the method as biologically implausible,[22] or even impossible, albeit unlikely to seriously damage the penis.[23] Still, if done excessively or harshly, jelqing could conceivably cause ruptures, scarring, disfigurement, and desensitization.[21][22]
So it’s worth asking, guys, do you really need a bigger penis? Most men who seek treatment for the condition called “short penis” actually fall within normal penis size, the researchers found; their sense of what’s normal is simply warped. To qualify for the clinical definition of short-penis syndrome, a man must be smaller than 1.6 in. (4 cm) when limp and under 3 in. (7.6 cm) when erect. In a 2005 study of 92 men who sought treatment for short penis, researchers found that none qualified for the syndrome.
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Added to that, she says, is the popularity of shows such as Love Island where objectification comes as standard. In the summer of 2017, one male contestant was described as having “a penis like a baseball bat”; it was, unequivocally, a compliment. None of this objectification is new, of course: it’s just new for men. “But that doesn’t lessen the impact,” Gregory says. “For the individual who is going through the trauma of fearing his penis is too small, this is still devastating.”
Unfortunately nobody can say how long it will take you. One individual may gain that in a few months while another may need 5 years to obtain it. Everyone is different, and genetics, routines, dedication, and many other factors come into play. Some people gain very easily while others have to “fight tooth and nail” for every 1/16 inch. I personally believe this has a lot to do with the thickness of the tunica albuginea, which is the thick, fibrous sheath covering the penile chambers (cavernosa). Think of it in this manner: the tunica is a bike tire, while the smooth muscle and cavernosa are the inner tube. The inner tube (erectile tissue) fills with air (blood) and expands until it fills the tire. If the tire (tunica) is thick it will be limited in how far it can expand. If the tire is thinner, it will be able to expand much further. Depending on how thick or thin your tunica is will have a bearing on how fast or easy you can gain. But to give you an idea, I can tell you that I am what one would consider a hard gainer. However with 2 years of PE and very consistent and dedicated work, I have gained a total of 5/8" length and 5/16-3/8" girth."
Alright, I’ve been using many techniques to add inches, used penis pumps, done kegels, jelqing, and even used the weight method. The best method out of those I think, was doing this. I normally didn’t bother with any method to gain size, I was decent in bed, but I noticed the ladies I dated weren’t too much into the length I had, so I started trying methods to boost it…Thanks

For men with performance issues who are physically healthy, Boyle often prescribes counseling, such as marriage counseling for men with relationship issues or psychiatric help for men who are preoccupied with a problem in penile appearance. For young men with sexual performance problems and no signs of physical problems, Boyle may prescribe counseling and a low dose of Viagra as they work out issues of insecurity. "They need reassurance from a physician that everything is OK," she says.

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