Penis pumps can increase size temporarily.  They pull more blood into the penile tissue than normally is supposed to be there to engorge the penis, and that blood is held in place with the aid of a cock-ring.  The results are more pronounced in those with larger penises to begin with (there's more to work with!) than those with smaller.  And you need to be careful to use a cock-ring safely, especially in conjunction with a pump.  Keep any erection too long, or over-engorge the penis and you will permanently damage your tool.

"They're a complete waste of time," says Professor Wylie. "Pills and lotions have no proven benefit. If they were effective, they would be on sale at chemists. Using a lotion may help a man become more familiar with his penis, which some men shy away from. So lotions can help a man become more comfortable with his penis but they certainly won't make it any bigger."
These products usually contain vitamins, minerals, herbs or hormones that claim to enlarge the penis. Despite their impressive claims, there's absolutely no clinical evidence that these products work and some may even be harmful. The University of Maryland in the US carried out an analysis on some of these and found traces of lead, pesticides, E. coli bacteria and animal faeces.

If we accept that an e-mail is analogous to a letter or a phone call, it is manifest that agents of the government cannot compel a commercial ISP [Internet Service Provider] to turn over the contents of an e-mail without triggering the Fourth Amendment. An ISP is the intermediary that makes e-mail communication possible. E-mails must pass through an ISP's servers to reach their intended recipient. Thus, the ISP is the functional equivalent of a post office or a telephone company. As we have discussed above, the police may not storm the post office and intercept a letter, and they are likewise forbidden from using the phone system to make a clandestine recording of a telephone call—unless they get a warrant, that is.


No herbal remedy can restore erections like Viagra and its prescription counterparts, says Steven Lamm, MD, an assistant professor of medicine at New York University and author of The Hardness Factor. But Lamm says these remedies may be appropriate for men who have experienced a decline in sexual performance but do not suffer from a diagnosable sexual problem. Lamm has endorsed an herbal remedy, marketed under the Roaring Tiger label, that combines horny goat weed and other herbal extracts with the amino acid L-arginine. (The supplements are made by the same company that makes the FastSize Extender.)

Berkeley went frantic in its attempt to keep the chargeback ratio low. The company "double-dinged" on charges, splitting transactions into two parts (one for the product, one for shipping), billing each separately. By 2003, it was triple-dinging charges to make the volume of "good" transactions appear higher. If Berkeley thought its chargeback ratio was too poor in any given month, employees would bill Warshak's personal credit cards with a host of one-dollar transactions until his card limits were reached; Warshak would then be reimbursed by the company.


Men who wish they had more stamina in the bedroom sometimes reach for male enhancement products. These products come in a liquid form and a tablet form that help men struggling with a healthy sex life. Choosing sexual enhancement tablets is a rough task because there are so many different types of products sold under this name. Walgreens.com offers male enhancement products from well-known brands as ExtenZe and Enzyte.
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