Amr Raheem is an andrology specialist (meaning his focus is on medicine relating to men) at University College London Hospitals, as well as a surgeon at International Andrology, a private clinic in the capital. Over the past 15 years, he has carried out more than 250 enlargements. “There is no typical patient,” Raheem says. “All professions, all ethnicities, married, single, gay, straight, rich, poor. It’s across the board. And all ages. I’ve worked on men in their 60s – I don’t know if they go out and use it afterwards. Early 20s, I won’t do. These are still boys. They must get to know it before they change it.”
Whatever the intellectual oddities of this position, seizing e-mail from Internet servers quickly became a practical boon for investigators. "Even just five years ago, if the government wanted to get access to potentially incriminating evidence from the home computers of ten different suspects, investigators had to convince a judge that they had probable cause in order to obtain a search warrant for each person," wrote security researcher Chris Soghoian in a 2009 paper. "The investigating agency would then send agents to raid the homes of the individuals, remove the computers, and later perform labor-intensive forensic analysis in order to get the files."
Surprised customers routinely demanded an end to auto-ship, and they wanted refunds. In late 2003, Warshak told his staff to remove the company's return shipping address from the label on its own products. "Let's make them call—work some deals," he said, telling call-center staff to convince unhappy customers to accept other "nutraceuticals" in lieu of cash refunds or credit.
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The resistance to refunds reached comic extremes. The dry description of Sixth Circuit Appeals Court Judge Danny Boggs illustrated the lengths to which Berkeley would go to avoid returning cash: "At one point, Enzyte customers seeking a refund were told they needed to obtain a notarized document indicating that they had experienced 'no size increase.' The admittedly ingenious idea behind the policy was that nobody 'would actually go and have anything notarized that said that they had a small penis.'

In Warshak's case, the government had used a retrospective process to gain access to prospective messages. The SCA does allow the government to issue "preservation" requests, but these apply only to existing records that might be at risk of deletion; they do not apply to future messages. The Department of Justice's own surveillance manual made this clear even at the time, reminding agents that preservation requests "have no prospective effect....[Preservation] letters can order a provider to preserve records that have already been created, but cannot order providers to preserve records not yet made."
Then, in the back of a weightlifting magazine, he saw an ad for the FastSize Extender, a device that claims to make the penis longer and fatter through traction. Richard began wearing the device almost eight hours a day, every day. He was shocked to notice a difference within a few days. After four months of wearing the device, he says his flaccid penis has stretched from 3 inches to over 5 inches; erect, he has gone from less than 6 inches to over 7 inches. The device cost $298, but Richard says the effect on his self-confidence has been priceless: "It made a world of difference to me."
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