“There’s no legitimate way to do it,” Danoff said, explaining that, unlike the breasts or the nose, the penis is not a static organ, it needs to move, and “there’s not a grafting material that’s suitable for that.” While there is one procedure that involves cutting the suspensory ligament, this only gives “an illusion of length,” he said. It doesn't actually extend it.
According to Danoff, most of the “thousands of [products] on the market today rely on the placebo effect.” The well-known placebo effect simply means that “about 40 percent of people,” in Danoff’s words, will report a positive result when given a useless product and told it will work. “When it comes to things sexual, the power of suggestion is overwhelmingly more than what goes on between your legs,” said Danoff, explaining how once you’ve paid your $39.99 for a pill or a device, you’ll be inclined to believe it really works.
Many manufacturers market the products as dietary supplements because the products contain natural ingredients, including vitamins and minerals. When shopping for male enhancement products, read the label carefully. You might find that the product contains the same ingredients as those found in a multivitamin. You should also look at what the product does because not all supplements promise the same thing. Some shoppers want a male enhancement supplement that increases stamina, but some men want a product that only contains natural ingredients.
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