Penis lengthening pills, stretch apparatus, vacuum pumps, silicone injections, and lengthening and thickening operations are available for men who worry about their penis size. Surgery is thus far the only proven scientific method for penile enlargement. In this article, we consider patient selection, outcome evaluation, and techniques applied. In our view, sexological counseling and detailed explanation of risks and complications are mandatory before any operative intervention.
Neither food nor any supplements influence penis growth or size. That’s the reason why all the so called penis pills offered on the internet simply don’t work at all, don’t believe all the fake promises. All those pills increase the blood flow only, which may cause a harder erections, but the effect instantly stops once you stop taking those pills. So, a lot of wasted money for non-permanent effect. It’s tempting, the sellers of those pills will show you doctors smiling from their websites, pseudo scientific studies from India they paid for, raving testimonials from famous pornstars but it’s just a huge scam scheme. It’s an extremely profitable business, selling cheap herbs for astronomical prices, combined with often shady long term recurring billing that’s hard to cancel. Bottom line: Penis pills are pure “snake oil” often made of cheap ingredients importet from China, overpriced and even potentially harmful for you health. Especially the contamination with heavy metals and carcinogenic colorings is a possible problem. Some sellers claim their products are manufactured in FDA approved laboratories, but this doesn’t mean the product itself is controlled by the FDA, like prescription drugs.
The resistance to refunds reached comic extremes. The dry description of Sixth Circuit Appeals Court Judge Danny Boggs illustrated the lengths to which Berkeley would go to avoid returning cash: "At one point, Enzyte customers seeking a refund were told they needed to obtain a notarized document indicating that they had experienced 'no size increase.' The admittedly ingenious idea behind the policy was that nobody 'would actually go and have anything notarized that said that they had a small penis.'
The fundamental issue went deeper than the improper preservation request, however, and struck at the heart of the SCA. If the government had to get warrants to open a suspect's postal mail or to search his home, why didn't the government need a warrant to seize e-mail stored on a third-party server? Wasn't this an "unreasonable search and seizure" under the Fourth Amendment?
• Eat less meat and cheese, and more fruits the vegetables. A diet high in animal fat raises cholesterol, which narrows the arteries, including those that carry blood into the penis. Try going a day or two a week without meat or cheese. And eat five to eight daily servings of fruits and vegetables. They contain antioxidants that help keep the arteries open.

Have you ever considered trying one of the many penis-enlargement techniques or products advertised today? The first thing you should know is that most men who think they have a small penis actually have a normal-sized penis. The second thing is that most penis enlargement claims are false. Some techniques and products can actually harm your penis.
The FBI and the Federal Trade Commission both began sniffing around Berkeley and soon unearthed a set of shocking corporate practices. In 2001 and 2002, Berkeley customers were "were simply added to the [auto-ship] program at the time of the initial sale without any indication that they would be on the hook for additional charges," wrote one federal judge, summing up the evidence amassed against Warshak and his firm.

Richard, a mechanic from upstate New York, is a muscular, athletic guy. He has a loving wife who has always enjoyed their sex life. But ever since he was a young boy, Richard couldn't get over the feeling that his penis was too small. In public bathrooms, he'd use the handicapped stall. He felt embarrassed in gym locker rooms and when standing naked before his wife. "I didn't feel manly enough," he tells WebMD.
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