One Stockport-based surgeon, Ravi Kant Agarwal, was struck off (though later allowed to practise again) after botching two procedures. One of his patients, the General Medical Council heard, was left with a penis “bent like a boomerang”. Agarwal was criticised for failing to explain potential complications and misleading patients about the possible outcome, as well as for not having anaesthetic backup during the operations.

Lawyers at the Electronic Frontier Foundation were jubilant. "Today's decision is the only federal appellate decision currently on the books that squarely rules on this critically important privacy issue," wrote EFF lawyer Kevin Bankston. "When the government secretly demands someone's e-mail without probable cause, the e-mail provider can confidently say: 'Come back with a warrant.'"
It's not clear if "Stiff Nights" is a "dietary supplement" as its maker claims, or a bad b-movie title, but in either case the FDA says men looking to "regain the thunder" should stay clear because the pill really contains sulfoaildenafil, an untested chemical similar to the active ingredient in Viagra, which can interact badly with nitrates and cause low blood pressure.
Professor Ralph at UCL believes that some clinics are feeding patients’ unrealistic expectations. “Initially, they don’t see doctors, they see sales people. It’s a hard sell: ‘We can get you an extra inch or two.’ I’ve been practising in the NHS for 30 years: if it was that easy to increase the length of a normal penis, I’d be in the Mediterranean on my cruise liner now.”
Have you ever considered trying one of the many penis-enlargement techniques or products advertised today? The first thing you should know is that most men who think they have a small penis actually have a normal-sized penis. The second thing is that most penis enlargement claims are false. Some techniques and products can actually harm your penis.
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Richard, a mechanic from upstate New York, is a muscular, athletic guy. He has a loving wife who has always enjoyed their sex life. But ever since he was a young boy, Richard couldn't get over the feeling that his penis was too small. In public bathrooms, he'd use the handicapped stall. He felt embarrassed in gym locker rooms and when standing naked before his wife. "I didn't feel manly enough," he tells WebMD.
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