What customers got for their money was a supply of herbal supplements designed to look as much like a pharmaceutical as possible, right down the shape and color of the tablets. Berkeley lacked scientific evidence that Enzyte worked, but it's fair to say that efficacy wasn't one of the company's chief concerns. For instance, Berkeley at some point reformulated Rovicid, its prostate-health/sex-enhancing supplement, as a "heart-health dietary supplement" instead. Rather than throw out the old Rovicid, Berkeley simply slapped new labels on the old containers—even though the new ingredient list didn't match what was in the tablets. In 2004, when Food and Drug Administration (FDA) inspectors came through the company's warehouse, the second shift manager went to the "sick aisle" of mislabeled products, packed the relabeled Rovicid into a rental truck, and drove it to the parking lot of another Berkeley-owned building. He restocked it after the inspectors left.
Men who wish they had more stamina in the bedroom sometimes reach for male enhancement products. These products come in a liquid form and a tablet form that help men struggling with a healthy sex life. Choosing sexual enhancement tablets is a rough task because there are so many different types of products sold under this name. Walgreens.com offers male enhancement products from well-known brands as ExtenZe and Enzyte.
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