In contrast to common believe, the small penis syndrome is a mental disorder, subsumed under body dismorphic disorders (BDDs) and/or anxiety disorders. Basically, it’s a wrong perception of the own body, Men affected by it believe their penis is way too small, are almost obsessed by this thought, although their manhood has a normal length and girth. While the symtoms are very severe, including depression, anxiety and isolation, it’s a very rare psycological disorder. It’s often triggered by very negative personal experiences, e.g. rejection by a woman and other sexual problems. In case you think your penis is tiny, but has normal measurements, seeking professional help is recommended. There is also a very detailed article by clinical psychologist Ph.D. Mark Dombeck on MentalHelp we recommend for more details about SPS, characteristics and treatment. He points out: “It appears to us that some men have perfectly adequate penises, based on the measurements they’ve communicated. These penises are not going to break any world records, but they are probably just fine, however, these men are firmly convinced that they are hopelessly inadequately small.”

So it’s worth asking, guys, do you really need a bigger penis? Most men who seek treatment for the condition called “short penis” actually fall within normal penis size, the researchers found; their sense of what’s normal is simply warped. To qualify for the clinical definition of short-penis syndrome, a man must be smaller than 1.6 in. (4 cm) when limp and under 3 in. (7.6 cm) when erect. In a 2005 study of 92 men who sought treatment for short penis, researchers found that none qualified for the syndrome.
As the name implies, the traction method involves the phallus being placed in an extender and then stretched daily. One team of researchers quoted in the study reported average growth of 0.7 inches (flaccid) in participants who used the method for four to six hours each day over four months. Another team reported an average increase of nearly an inch (0.9 inches, flaccid) plus some slight improvement in girth after similar treatments lasting a course of six months.
But when the Supreme Court took the case, it gutted this logic. "The Fourth Amendment protects people, not places," wrote Justice Potter Stewart for the majority. "What a person knowingly exposes to the public, even in his own home or office, is not a subject of Fourth Amendment protection. But what he seeks to preserve as private, even in an area accessible to the public, may be constitutionally protected." He went on: "No less than an individual in a business office, in a friend's apartment, or in a taxicab, a person in a telephone booth may rely upon the protection of the Fourth Amendment. One who occupies it, shuts the door behind him, and pays the toll that permits him to place a call is surely entitled to assume that the words he utters into the mouthpiece will not be broadcast to the world. To read the Constitution more narrowly is to ignore the vital role that the public telephone has come to play in private communication."
Apart from the risks, penoplasty (surgical penile lengthening and girth enhancement) is the most expensive way for penile enhancement. According to About Health it ranges from $4000 up to $17000. If you are interested in surgical enhancement, we recommend reading the in-depth article on Medscape about possible surgical techniques and results. There is a less risky new method, the FDA-cleared Penuma implant developed by Dr. Elist (James Elist, MD) for flacid size enlargement, but the erect size lengthening is minimal and the cost is in the low five digits, too.
Then, in the back of a weightlifting magazine, he saw an ad for the FastSize Extender, a device that claims to make the penis longer and fatter through traction. Richard began wearing the device almost eight hours a day, every day. He was shocked to notice a difference within a few days. After four months of wearing the device, he says his flaccid penis has stretched from 3 inches to over 5 inches; erect, he has gone from less than 6 inches to over 7 inches. The device cost $298, but Richard says the effect on his self-confidence has been priceless: "It made a world of difference to me."
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