All this might be leading to more than simple image anxiety; some have pointed to a new mental-health issue they term penile dysmorphic disorder. “It is a minority of men – and we don’t know how many – but it certainly exists and it’s as damaging as any other body dysmorphia,” says Professor David Veale, of King’s College London, an authority on health anxieties. “These men might seek out surgery, and for a few months they will be happy with the results. But then the same anxieties reappear. So, they seek out further surgery. It becomes a circle. But you cannot keep making your penis bigger. This requires therapy.”
Anxiety is everywhere, floating freely through the air, passing from person to person like a virus on the wings of a sneeze. While some of us feel nervous about our jobs, our health, or our families, others feel a very personal dread about our own bodies. Preoccupied by physical appearances, we can become distracted from what matters most in life, and turn instead to worrying about some highly specific body part. If, by chance, we zero in on the piece of ourselves most closely associated with intimacy — our genitals — we might shut down entirely.
Many manufacturers market the products as dietary supplements because the products contain natural ingredients, including vitamins and minerals. When shopping for male enhancement products, read the label carefully. You might find that the product contains the same ingredients as those found in a multivitamin. You should also look at what the product does because not all supplements promise the same thing. Some shoppers want a male enhancement supplement that increases stamina, but some men want a product that only contains natural ingredients.
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