Richard, a mechanic from upstate New York, is a muscular, athletic guy. He has a loving wife who has always enjoyed their sex life. But ever since he was a young boy, Richard couldn't get over the feeling that his penis was too small. In public bathrooms, he'd use the handicapped stall. He felt embarrassed in gym locker rooms and when standing naked before his wife. "I didn't feel manly enough," he tells WebMD.

Berkeley Nutraceuticals entered bankruptcy as a result of the investigation, but it was rescued by its local landlord, Pristine Bay, which said it didn't want to lose an anchor tenant. Berkeley's name was changed to Vianda. The company now sells a "new" Enzyte blend that includes horny goat weed, ginseng, and ginkgo biloba — though it says it has ditched the shady sales practices. As for Smilin' Bob, he's still smiling his way through TV commercials; devotees can even order "Livin' Large" T-shirts adorned with the character's face.


The fact is verification is sadly lacking for nearly all of the male enhancement products on the market, while in many cases, there are definite warnings against these products. Specifically, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a warning against dietary supplements to enhance male sexual performance, noting many have undisclosed ingredients that may be harmful. This government agency also cautioned against penis enlargers and erection-maintaining rings in at least one public alert.
Many manufacturers market the products as dietary supplements because the products contain natural ingredients, including vitamins and minerals. When shopping for male enhancement products, read the label carefully. You might find that the product contains the same ingredients as those found in a multivitamin. You should also look at what the product does because not all supplements promise the same thing. Some shoppers want a male enhancement supplement that increases stamina, but some men want a product that only contains natural ingredients.
×