The surgical treatments, the researchers found, were dangerous and had “unacceptably high rate of complications.” But among the nonsurgical methods, at least one appeared to help grow a man’s member: the “traction method,” in which a penile extender stretched the phallus daily, resulted in average growth of 0.7 in., or 1.8 cm, of the flaccid penis in one study. In another study of the same method, men reported an average increase of 0.9 in. (2.3 cm) in length while flaccid and 0.67 in. (1.7 cm) while erect.


Mukta Agrawal is a qualified nutritionist, and has been in the health and fitness arena since 7 years. She has a post graduate degree in clinical nutrition and dietetics, and is passionate about educating people regarding the truths and myths of health through the InLife Blog. Her belief in the fact that good health is for everyone is one of the highlights of her writing.
So how can we be sure it really exists? “Because the number of men seeking surgery, or the growth of this strange industry selling pills and other so-called enlargement remedies, these numbers do not map up with the numbers of men who actually have a significantly smaller penis than average,” Veale says. “So, these men are worrying about – and seeking solutions for – a problem they do not have.”
Some surgical methods have the most evidence of effectiveness, whereas others have fairly frequent complications, sometimes severe, including scarring that lead, ultimately, to penis shrinkage or erectile dysfunction.[1][2] Noninvasive methods have received little scientific study, and most lack scientific evidence of effectiveness, although scientific evidence supports some elongation by prolonged traction.[3] Some quack products may improve penis erection, mistaken by consumers for penis enlargement.

The sheer symbolism of what’s in a man’s pants may be a factor. As Harrison Pope and Katharine Phillips write in their book on male body obsessions, The Adonis Complex, genitals have been equated with “virility, procreative potency, and power” throughout history. This has been compounded by an apparent rise in general masculine vanity. Figures from the British Association of Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons show the total number of male procedures doubled between 2005 and 2015, with breast reduction, rhinoplasty and neck lifts especially popular. For those in need of rejuvenation, surgery is cheaper and more easily available than ever.


The fundamental issue went deeper than the improper preservation request, however, and struck at the heart of the SCA. If the government had to get warrants to open a suspect's postal mail or to search his home, why didn't the government need a warrant to seize e-mail stored on a third-party server? Wasn't this an "unreasonable search and seizure" under the Fourth Amendment?

Then, in the back of a weightlifting magazine, he saw an ad for the FastSize Extender, a device that claims to make the penis longer and fatter through traction. Richard began wearing the device almost eight hours a day, every day. He was shocked to notice a difference within a few days. After four months of wearing the device, he says his flaccid penis has stretched from 3 inches to over 5 inches; erect, he has gone from less than 6 inches to over 7 inches. The device cost $298, but Richard says the effect on his self-confidence has been priceless: "It made a world of difference to me."

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