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But when the Supreme Court took the case, it gutted this logic. "The Fourth Amendment protects people, not places," wrote Justice Potter Stewart for the majority. "What a person knowingly exposes to the public, even in his own home or office, is not a subject of Fourth Amendment protection. But what he seeks to preserve as private, even in an area accessible to the public, may be constitutionally protected." He went on: "No less than an individual in a business office, in a friend's apartment, or in a taxicab, a person in a telephone booth may rely upon the protection of the Fourth Amendment. One who occupies it, shuts the door behind him, and pays the toll that permits him to place a call is surely entitled to assume that the words he utters into the mouthpiece will not be broadcast to the world. To read the Constitution more narrowly is to ignore the vital role that the public telephone has come to play in private communication."
The sheer symbolism of what’s in a man’s pants may be a factor. As Harrison Pope and Katharine Phillips write in their book on male body obsessions, The Adonis Complex, genitals have been equated with “virility, procreative potency, and power” throughout history. This has been compounded by an apparent rise in general masculine vanity. Figures from the British Association of Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons show the total number of male procedures doubled between 2005 and 2015, with breast reduction, rhinoplasty and neck lifts especially popular. For those in need of rejuvenation, surgery is cheaper and more easily available than ever.
Think it through carefully before getting surgery. Surgical penis enlargement, or phalloplasty, has unfortunate side effects. The penis is extended in length, but you sacrifice function. After an enlargement procedure the penis is no longer able to stand out from the body; instead, it hangs between the legs. And sometimes, it no longer gets erect at all.[12] Looking into natural solutions is a much better bet.

Many doctors question whether the benefits of lengthening surgery outweigh the risks. A 2006 study found that only 35% of men were satisfied with the outcome of surgery, which added only half an inch, on average, to length. Men who are overly preoccupied with penis length tend to have unrealistic expectations of surgery and should seek counseling instead, the authors wrote.
No herbal remedy can restore erections like Viagra and its prescription counterparts, says Steven Lamm, MD, an assistant professor of medicine at New York University and author of The Hardness Factor. But Lamm says these remedies may be appropriate for men who have experienced a decline in sexual performance but do not suffer from a diagnosable sexual problem. Lamm has endorsed an herbal remedy, marketed under the Roaring Tiger label, that combines horny goat weed and other herbal extracts with the amino acid L-arginine. (The supplements are made by the same company that makes the FastSize Extender.)
That’s usually because they’re not getting enough blood flow to the penis, which could be the result of being overweight, smoking, increased cholesterol, high blood pressure, diabetes, or cardiovascular disease. So the first step in your penis-growing experiment should be to get the rest of your body healthy — especially your cardiovascular system. “What’s good for the heart is good for the penis,” says Fisch.
Many manufacturers market the products as dietary supplements because the products contain natural ingredients, including vitamins and minerals. When shopping for male enhancement products, read the label carefully. You might find that the product contains the same ingredients as those found in a multivitamin. You should also look at what the product does because not all supplements promise the same thing. Some shoppers want a male enhancement supplement that increases stamina, but some men want a product that only contains natural ingredients.
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